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Fiber Optic Cable


Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Cable Installation- Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Installers-Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Cable Installer-Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Services-Walnut Creek Fiber Switch Installation-National Rollouts-IT-Fiber Optics-Wi-Fi-Phone Systems-Security-Call Tollfree (866) 650-DATA or click the live support button below to talk to us.

Fiber Optic Cable Installation-Fiber Optic Installers- Fiber Optic Cable Installer, Fiber Switch Installer- System Integrator- Fiber Optic Switch Installation

ATEK Communications now in the Bay Area offers the following services in Walnut Creek:Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Cable Installation, Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Installers,Walnut Creek Fiber Optic Cable Installer,Walnut Creek Fiber Switch Installer,Walnut Creek Fiber Switch Installation. ATEK is a national data contractor and system integrator specializing in being a quality fiber optic cable installer has offices in California and Florida & are part of a nationwide team of fiber optic cable installers & network integration & system integration personnel that can be mobilized anytime, anywhere in the US and abroad Internationally.

ATEK specializes in all areas as a fiber optic cable installer of both OSP fiber optic cable installations- or underground fiber cable- to backbone structured cable fiber optic cable installations. ATEK also offers the ability to tie in the fiber optic cable installations to the Network Integration side of your cable plant through the use of fiber optic patch panels, fiber optic tranceivers or fiber optic multiplexers that migrate the fiber optic light signals into recognizable data streams for copper based switches. ATEK can take any signal from a T1 to OC-12 from the central office to the desktop. We can offer you design or design- build services at affordable rates. Our network integration specialists are backed by seasoned teams of administrators, project managers, and technicians who are equipped to handle virtually any nework installation project.

AT ATEK we ensure that the fiber optic cabling system design, components, and workmanship comply with the standards and practices of BICSI. These standards and practices are elaborated in the Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, the EIA/TIA Telecommunications Building Wiring Standard, The National Fire Protection Assn., and the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70).

Our fiber optic certifications, extensive experience on fiber optics installation, and knowledge of fiber optic technologies and standards are key factors in our successful delivery of fiber network solutions. leading fiber optic suppliers. Together we can deliver the solution that best meets your application needs, now and long term.

Our services include:

  • Design and Installation of Fiber Optic Cabling
  • Fiber Optic Termination
  • Light Interconnection Units and Fiber Shelves
  • Testing and Certifications
  • Fiber Tray and Raceway
  • Fiber Innerduct
  • Wall-mount and Freestanding Cabinets and Racks
  • Fiber Optic Fusion and Mechanical Splicing

Our certified RCDDs a nd LAN/WAN Specialists work closely with contractors and end users to deliver the latest cabling technologies that best suit the needed applications

All fiber optic cabling system designs are reviewed and installations quality checked by a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). This is a professional designation of the Building Industry Consulting Services International (BICSI).

On & Offsite Service

ATEK Communications service comes with a guarantee of quality and a commitment to support. Because we feel so strongly about professionally serving our clients, we offer on and offsite services designed to meet your needs:

Onsite-Project Management-IT Services-Installations

  • ATEK has Available- 24-hour, 7-day a week dispatching by field-trained support staff
  • ATEK Professional and helpful technicians who arrive on time and in uniform
  • ATEK Provides Customized software available that allows you to monitor and document progress in real-time and at your convenience
  • ATEK will provide Short- or long-term onsite IT Sevices and project management-that frees up your staff

Offsite-Project Management-IT Services-Installations

  • ATEK has available 24-hour, 7-day a week dispatching by field-trained support staff
  • ATEK's Help Desk services available- 24/7 services available
  • ATEK's Level I support for immediate solutions on a remote basis
  • ATEK's Level II support includes remote solutions and dispatched technicians
  • ATEK'sLevel III support with a technician dispatched to your location
  • ATEK's Level IV support with supervisory-management responsibilites

We ensure that the fiber optic cabling system design, components, and workmanship comply with the standards and practices of BICSI. These standards and practices are elaborated in the Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, the EIA/TIA Telecommunications Building Wiring Standard, The National Fire Protection Assn., and the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70).

Tampa Bay Cabling & Network Installation Services

California Offices Northern CA (925) 944-0777

California Offices Southern CA (619) 573- 4164

Tampa - St. Pete - Clearwayter, Florida s (866) 650-DATA or (727) 547- 2200

ATEK Communications has BICSI certified installers fully versed in fiber optic distribution designs and installations for a wide range of fiber optic network applications. We can help you integrate data and telecommunication networks over fiber effectively .

Our certified RCDD, Certified Network Specialist and BICSI Technicians work as team to bring the latest fiber optic technologies to our customers. We provide design, installation , and certifications of fiber optic cabling systems in central offices, POP sites, commercial, and residential sites.

ATEK Communications, a system integrator with offices in California and Florida are part of a nationwide team of network integration and system integration personnel that can be mobilized anytime, anywhere in the US. ATEK specializes in all areas of Network Integration from the central office to the desktop. We can offer you design or design- build services at affordable rates. Our network integration specialists are backed by seasoned teams of administrators, project managers, and technicians who are equipped to handle virtually any nework installation project. We can provide your company with complete OSI level 1-7 services including structured cabling services to DSL, wireless, VOIP , and installation of firewalls.Our established relationships with leading vendors also assure the best possible service and quality equipment is provided to our customers.All CAT 5e and CAT 6 & fiber optic cabling system designs are reviewed by our project managers and quality control engineers and installations quality checked by a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD).

Our certified RCDDs and LAN/WAN Specialists work closely with contractors and end users to deliver the latest cabling technologies that best suit the needed applications.

All fiber optic cabling system designs are reviewed and installations quality checked by a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). This is a professional designation of the Building Industry Consulting Services International (BICSI).

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We ensure that the fiber optic cabling system design, components, and workmanship comply with the standards and practices of BICSI. These standards and practices are elaborated in the Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, the EIA/TIA Telecommunications Building Wiring Standard, The National Fire Protection Assn., and the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70).

Our fiber optic certifications, extensive experience on fiber optics installation, and knowledge of fiber optic technologies and standards are key factors in our successful delivery of fiber network solutions. leading fiber optic suppliers. Together we can deliver the solution that best meets your application needs, now and long term.All fiber optic cabling system designs are reviewed and installations quality checked by a Registered Communications Distribution Designer (RCDD). This is a professional designation of the Building Industry Consulting Services International (BICSI).

We ensure that the fiber optic cabling system design, components, and workmanship comply with the standards and practices of BICSI. These standards and practices are elaborated in the Telecommunications Distribution Methods Manual, the EIA/TIA Telecommunications Building Wiring Standard, The National Fire Protection Assn., and the National Electrical Code (NFPA-70).

WARRANTY

Our fiber optic cabling installations are supported by extended warranties that guarantees both end to end performance and application assurance for you. Our technicians are certified on every product installation that we design and are well trained on the industry structured cabling standard.

The specific standards of the EIA/TIA Building Telecommunications Wiring Standards are:

    · EIA/TIA-568A (Commercial Building Telecommunications Wiring Standard)
    · EIA/TIA-569 (Commercial Building Standard for Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces)
    · EIA/TIA-570 (Residential and Light Commercial Telecommunications Wiring Standard)
    · EIA/TIA-606 (Administration Standard for Telecommunications Infrastructure of Commercial Buildings)
    · EIA/TIA-607 (Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications)
    · EIA/TIA-TSB-67 (Transmission Performance Specifications for Field Testing of UTP Cabling Systems)

 

 

BRIEF OVER VIEW OF FIBER OPTIC CABLE ADVANTAGES OVER COPPER:

• SPEED: Fiber optic networks operate at high speeds - up into the gigabits
• BANDWIDTH: large carrying capacity
• DISTANCE: Signals can be transmitted further without needing to be "refreshed" or strengthened.
• RESISTANCE: Greater resistance to electromagnetic noise such as radios, motors or other nearby cables.
• MAINTENANCE: Fiber optic cables costs much less to maintain.


In recent years it has become apparent that fiber-optics are steadily replacing copper wire as an appropriate means of communication signal transmission. They span the long distances between local phone systems as well as providing the backbone for many network systems. Other system users include cable television services, university campuses, office buildings, industrial plants, and electric utility companies.

A fiber-optic system is similar to the copper wire system that fiber-optics is replacing. The difference is that fiber-optics use light pulses to transmit information down fiber lines instead of using electronic pulses to transmit information down copper lines. Looking at the components in a fiber-optic chain will give a better understanding of how the system works in conjunction with wire based systems.

At one end of the system is a transmitter. This is the place of origin for information coming on to fiber-optic lines. The transmitter accepts coded electronic pulse information coming from copper wire. It then processes and translates that information into equivalently coded light pulses. A light-emitting diode (LED) or an injection-laser diode (ILD) can be used for generating the light pulses. Using a lens, the light pulses are funneled into the fiber-optic medium where they transmit themselves down the line.

Think of a fiber cable in terms of very long cardboard roll (from the inside roll of paper towel) that is coated with a mirror.
If you shine a flashlight in one you can see light at the far end - even if bent the roll around a corner.

Light pulses move easily down the fiber-optic line because of a principle known as total internal reflection. "This principle of total internal reflection states that when the angle of incidence exceeds a critical value, light cannot get out of the glass; instead, the light bounces back in. When this principle is applied to the construction of the fiber-optic strand, it is possible to transmit information down fiber lines in the form of light pulses.Fiber optic cable functions as a "light guide," guiding the light introduced at one end of the cable through to the other end. The light source can either be a light-emitting diode (LED)) or a laser.

The light source is pulsed on and off, and a light-sensitive receiver on the other end of the cable converts the pulses back into the digital ones and zeros of the original signal.

Even laser light shining through a fiber optic cable is subject to loss of strength, primarily through dispersion and scattering of the light, within the cable itself. The faster the laser fluctuates, the greater the risk of dispersion. Light strengtheners, called repeaters, may be necessary to refresh the signal in certain applications.

While fiber optic cable itself has become cheaper over time - a equivalent length of copper cable cost less per foot but not in capacity. Fiber optic cable connectors and the equipment needed to install them are still more expensive than their copper counterparts.

The use of fiber-optics was generally not available until 1970 when Corning Glass Works was able to produce a fiber with a loss of 20 dB/km. It was recognized that optical fiber would be feasible for telecommunication transmission only if glass could be developed so pure that attenuation would be 20dB/km or less. That is, 1% of the light would remain after traveling 1 km. Today's optical fiber attenuation ranges from 0.5dB/km to 1000dB/km depending on the optical fiber used. Attenuation limits are based on intended application.

The applications of optical fiber communications have increased at a rapid rate, since the first commercial installation of a fiber-optic system in 1977. Telephone companies began early on, replacing their old copper wire systems with optical fiber lines. Today's telephone companies use optical fiber throughout their system as the backbone architecture and as the long-distance connection between city phone systems.

Cable television companies have also began integrating fiber-optics into their cable systems. The trunk lines that connect central offices have generally been replaced with optical fiber. Some providers have begun experimenting with fiber to the curb using a fiber/coaxial hybrid. Such a hybrid allows for the integration of fiber and coaxial at a neighborhood location. This location, called a node, would provide the optical receiver that converts the light impulses back to electronic signals. The signals could then be fed to individual homes via coaxial cable.

Local Area Networks (LAN) is a collective group of computers, or computer systems, connected to each other allowing for shared program software or data bases. Colleges, universities, office buildings, and industrial plants, just to name a few, all make use of optical fiber within their LAN systems.

Power companies are an emerging group that have begun to utilize fiber-optics in their communication systems. Most power utilities already have fiber-optic communication systems in use for monitoring their power grid systems.

Single Mode cable is a single stand of glass fiber with a diameter of 8.3 to 10 microns that has one mode of transmission. Single Mode Fiber with a relatively narrow diameter, through which only one mode will propagate typically 1310 or 1550nm. Carries higher bandwidth than multimode fiber, but requires a light source with a narrow spectral width. Synonyms mono-mode optical fiber, single-mode fiber, single-mode optical waveguide, uni-mode fiber.

Single-mode fiber gives you a higher transmission rate and up to 50 times more distance than multimode, but it also costs more. Single-mode fiber has a much smaller core than multimode. The small core and single light-wave virtually eliminate any distortion that could result from overlapping light pulses, providing the least signal attenuation and the highest transmission speeds of any fiber cable type.

Single-mode optical fiber is an optical fiber in which only the lowest order bound mode can propagate at the wavelength of interest typically 1300 to 1320nm.

Multimode cable is made of of glass fibers, with a common diameters in the 50-to-100 micron range for the light carry component (the most common size is 62.5). POF is a newer plastic-based cable which promises performance similar to glass cable on very short runs, but at a lower cost.

Multimode fiber gives you high bandwidth at high speeds over medium distances. Light waves are dispersed into numerous paths, or modes, as they travel through the cable's core typically 850 or 1300nm. Typical multimode fiber core diameters are 50, 62.5, and 100 micrometers. However, in long cable runs (greater than 3000 feet [914.4 ml), multiple paths of light can cause signal distortion at the receiving end, resulting in an unclear and incomplete data transmission.


Fiber Optic Testing Equipment

ATEK also offers fiber opic testing. ATEK can assist your organization whether you need central office testing or outside plant singlemode splicing. For example, there are two methods to measure test loss, single-ended loss and double-ended loss. Single-ended loss works by using only the launch cable while the double-ended loss works by using a received cable attached to the meter also. All are technicians are certified by the manufacturers we represent to perform the tests.